Public Health Program Social Justice Speakers Series 2017

Session 1: 8/28/17 - The State of Our Justice System and Health

(Reception immediately following lecture: Farragut Inn)

Dr. Miller’s research examines life at the intersection of punishment and social welfare policy. His projects include an ethnography of prisoner reentry in Chicago, Detroit, and New York, demonstrating how emergent techniques of state and third-party supervision have transformed citizenship, activism, community, and family life in the age of mass supervision. Dr. Miller's broad research interests include criminal justice and social welfare policy, race and ethnic relations, and the urban poor.

Speaker:

Reuben Miller, PhDReuben Miller, PhD
Assistant Professor
The University of Chicago
School of Social Service Administration


Bio

Reuben Miller is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration (SSA). His broad research interests include criminal justice and social welfare policy, race and ethnic relations, and the urban poor.

Prior to coming to SSA, Miller was an Assistant Professor in the University of Michigan School of Social Work and a Faculty Associate at the University of Michigan Population Studies Center.

Miller received his Ph.D. from Loyola University Chicago.

Professor Miller's research examines life at the intersection of punishment and social welfare policy. His projects include an ethnography of prisoner reentry in Chicago, Detroit, and New York, demonstrating how emergent techniques of state and third-party supervision have transformed citizenship, activism, community, and family life in the age of mass supervision.

Publications

  • Miller, R. and G. Purifoye. In Press. Carceral devolution and the transformation of urban poverty in the United States. In Inderblitzen, M., Meek, R. and L. Abrams (Eds). The Voluntary Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Institutional and Personal Change.
  • Patton, D., R. Miller, E. Cornfield, A. Gale, and J. Garbarino. In Press. Hardiness Scripts: High Achieving African American Males in a Chicago Charter School Navigating Community Violence and School. Journal of Community Psychology.
  • Watkins, D., D. Patton, and R. Miller. 2016. The state of boys and men of color post-Ferguson. Journal of Men’s Studies.
  • Miller, R., Miller, J., Zeleskov Djoric, J., and D. Patton. 2015. Baldwin’s Mill: Race, Carceral Expansion and the Pedagogy of Repression, 1965-2015. Humanity and Society, 39(4): 456-475
  • Miller, R., D. Patton, and E. Williams. 2015. Rethinking Reentry. Offender Programs Report 19 (1).
  • Patton, D. and R. Miller. 2015. Examining the relationship between adolescent violence exposure and adulthood violence perpetration among urban black and African American men. American Academy of Violence and Abuse Research Reviews.
  • Miller, R. 2014. Devolving the carceral state: Race, prisoner reentry and the micro-politics of urban poverty management. Punishment and Society 16(3): 305-335.
  • Miller, R. 2013. Race, hyper incarceration and U.S. poverty policy in historical perspective. Sociology Compass 7 (7): 573-589.
  • Nkansa-Amankra, S., S. Agbanu and R. Miller. 2013. Disparities in health, poverty, incarceration and social justice among racial groups in the United States: A critical review. International Journal of Health Services 43 (2): 217-240.
  • Miller, R. and S. Haymes. 2012. Poverty, incarceration: A brief introduction. Journal of Poverty: Innovations on Social, Political and Economic Inequalities, 16 (3): 233-235.
  • Miller, R. and S. Haymes. (Eds). 2012. Poverty, incarceration: Managing the poor in the neoliberal age. Journal of Poverty, 16 (4).
  • Miller, R. and F. F. Piven. 2012. Poor people’s movements and the power to disrupt: An interview with Frances Fox Piven.” Journal of Poverty: Innovations on Social, Political and Economic Inequalities 16 (3): 363-373